How to Install a New Toilet

How to Install a New Toilet

New toilet day is an exciting time for any household. Many families might replace a toilet only once, or never, during their residence in a particular home. When you do make a new addition to the bathroom toilet plumbing, it’s important to do it right. Read on for tips on how to install your new toilet yourself. Finding the Right Toilet for Your Bathroom   Before you run out and purchase a new toilet, you need to measure the space where it will go in the bathroom to ensure that you buy a model that will fit. Then, when picking out the toilet, the easiest way to go is to get a full kit that includes all the bolts you need as well as a new wax seal. If you pick out a model that has a separate toilet bowl and tank, verify that they are a matching pair. Once the old toilet is out of the picture, and the floor is totally clean of grime andwax, you’re ready to set your new throne into place. When you have all the parts at hand, follow these steps to make your toilet operational: First, install the bolts into the floor or flange around the soil pipe, depending on the model toilet you have. Next, flip the bowl upside down and set the wax ring around the hole on the bottom that empties waste from your bathroom toilet plumbing. Flip the bowl back over and loosely set it in place on top of the soil pipe. Gradually tighten the bolts, alternating between tightening the nuts and slightly rocking the toilet so it settles firmly down into place. If you have bolt caps,...
Tips on Removing an Old Toilet from Your Bathroom

Tips on Removing an Old Toilet from Your Bathroom

Sometimes, working with pipes can be nasty business, especially when it comes to your bathroom toilet plumbing. When it’s time to replace your toilet, removing the old one from its spot in the bathroom can be a bit unpleasant. However, it’s also a relatively simple job, one that you should be able to complete yourself without calling a plumber. Read on for tips on how to get an old toilet out of the bathroom without making a horrific mess.   Removing the Remaining Water   The first thing you need to do before you pull out the old toilet is to turn the water off. In most cases, you can shut a valve on the toilet’s supply line so you don’t have to bother shutting down the water to the entire home. Next, once the water is off, flush the toilet so the tank empties out. If any residual water remains inside, mop it out. Make sure the tank is completely empty to save you from cleaning up a nasty mess.   Once the tank is dry, you can disconnect the supply line – most toilets require a wrench for this step. Next, if there’s any water left in the bowl, suck it out with a wet-dry vac. Alternatively, you can use a sponge to remove the remaining water if you’re willing to stick your hand in the bowl. Once all the water is gone and the bathroom toilet plumbing is completely disconnected, you’re ready to start the physical removal process.   Saying Goodbye to a Good Toilet   To actually get the toilet out of the bathroom, you...
When Do I Need to Call a Plumber?

When Do I Need to Call a Plumber?

There are plumbing problems you can handle on your own, but others are too big to tackle. Do you know when you need to call in professional help? The five scenarios below may surprise you. The faucet won’t stop dripping Most people have lived with a dripping faucet at some point. After all, a slight leak like that really isn’t causing much trouble – or is it? Left unchecked, that dripping can lead to a lot of wasted water: According to the EPA, a leak of 1 drip per second can waste as much as 3,000 gallons of water a year! Worse yet, the leak could be indicative of a bigger plumbing problem. You can try your own hand at fixing the leak, but if that doesn’t work don’t be afraid to call in the professionals. Churchwell Plumbing can get to the source of the trouble and explain the best course of action. Your bathtub won’t drain A bathtub clog must be dealt with immediately. It will only worsen with time, and you’ll be left with more standing water in your tub. A plumber can clear the obstruction and check to be certain it isn’t part of a bigger problem. You can save yourself time and aggravation by addressing the problem early whenever possible. Call Churchwell Plumbing as soon as your tub begins draining slowly, before it escalates to a full clog. Water isn’t flowing correctly Poor or inconsistent water pressure throughout your home can be a problem. If it’s only in the shower or a faucet or two it may simply be a matter of cleaning mineral buildup...
Hidden Water Leaks in your Home

Hidden Water Leaks in your Home

Early detection of a water leak can save you money and avoid potential disaster. Here are some signs that you may have a leak and should consider contacting a plumber. Check your water meter- One of the best ways to tell if you have a leak in some part of your plumbing is to check the water meter. To do this, you’ll first have to turn off all the water in your home. Shut off all faucets, and make sure the dishwasher and washing machine are not running. Next, watch the meter and see if it is spinning. If it does, you likely have a fast-moving leak. If the meter doesn’t change immediately, wait two hours and check it again. If it has changed despite all the water being off, you may be dealing with a slower leak. The leak could be anywhere after the meter, or even underground. Remember that all piping after the meter is a homeowner’s responsibility. Look at your usage- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommends checking your winter water usage to find out if a leak is occurring somewhere in your home. If a family of four is using more than 12,000 gallons of water per month, there’s probably a serious leak problem somewhere in your plumbing system. Monitor your bill- If your bill is rising consistently but your water use habits haven’t changed, a leak may be to blame. Gather some bills from the past few months and compare them to see if there’s a steady increase. Your water bill should remain within the same range month to month. Remember that some of...
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