Summer Plumbing Tips

Summer Plumbing Tips

It’s getting hot in here! The rising temperatures often results in more water usage both in and outdoors. Families have been estimated to use 25-50% more water during the hottest months of the year. We want to help our customers save money, so here are some helpful tips to follow this summer to not put so much pressure on your plumbing. If you’re vacationing away from your home for several days, turn down your water heater to save energy. It’s also important to know that the average life of a water heater is anywhere from 8-11 years old. If you don’t know the age of your system, check the last four digits of the serial number on the tank. This will show you the month and year it was manufactured. If you are entertaining and having people over for a cookout or get-together, make sure the food doesn’t end up down the drain. A clogged garbage disposal is no fun! Water your lawn at the right time! We suggest that the best time to water lawns and landscapes is in the early morning or evening after the sun goes down. If you chose to tend to your lawn in the middle of the day, that water may be lost due to evaporation from the heat throughout the day. More outdoor fun means more dirty clothes. Be sure to check your washing machine hoses for bulges, leaks or cracks and be sure to remove dryer lint regularly. Remember, washing machine hoses should be replaced approximately every three years. Every season brings a new challenge to your plumbing. In order to...
Quick Tips to Check Your Plumbing

Quick Tips to Check Your Plumbing

Spring is here, which means it’s time to take care of some spring cleaning. It’s important to take care of everything in the house, including checking your plumbing for potential problems which may have developed over the winter months. Here are some quick tips to check your plumbing in the kitchen and bathroom, for appliances and outside: Leaks and Drips – The kitchen and bathrooms have many different things that could cause a problem, so it important that you find and take care of those issues that may have sprung a leak. Protecting your drains with strainers will help prevent hair, soap and debris from clogging up the drains. Finally, check your toilets to see if there are any hidden leaks. You can do this by adding six drops of food coloring to the toilet tank. If you see that color appear in the toilet bowl within 30 minutes, you may have a leak in your toilet. The final thing to pay attention to is your bathroom is your shower head, it probably has some mineral deposit that has built up. It is easy to clean the mineral deposit by unscrewing the shower head and soaking it in vinegar overnight. Appliances – Be sure to check your water heater, dishwasher, washing machine and ice maker. When checking the water heater, be sure to note that it should not be set higher than 120 degree Fahrenheit to reduce energy use. Next, flush out corrosion by draining several gallons of water from the heater tank. Bulges and leaks in the hoses of dishwasher, washing machine, or ice maker show that there...
What is Orangeburg Pipe?

What is Orangeburg Pipe?

Orangeburg pipe is a type of home sewer pipe used in most properties built from 1945 to 1972. Made of a mixture of hot pitch and wood pulp, these pipes are known for their structural complications after prolonged use. Once installed, standard Orangeburg pipes lines are expected to last 50 years time; however, many systems begin to falter after a mere 30 years of use. For systems installed in the late 60’s or early 70’s, this means pipe failure due to deterioration or structural issues may be imminent. If you are noticing decreased water flow, exceptionally high water bills or moist indentations on your property, it may be time to have your Orangeburg pipe systems inspected for damage. In this blog, we break down everything you need to know about Orangeburg pipe systems, as well as the best ways to repair or replace them when the time comes. The History and Use of Orangeburg Pipe Lines Brittle, lightweight and easy to produce, Orangeburg pipe systems were produced solely by the Orangeburg Manufacturing Company following World War II, during the massive housing boom that ensued after the war. The fibrous, wood-and- pitch composition pioneered by the Fiber Conduit Company in the early 20 th  century, made Orangeburg pipe an affordable alternative to other iron or clay pipe lines (this led to its broad use in mid-century America). Typically made with diameters between 2 and 18 inches, Orangeburg fell out of popularity in the early 1970s, as more reliable, efficiently produced pipe materials became available. While provided a life expectancy of 50 years, many Orangeburg pipe systems were susceptible to failure in as little as 10 years, due to the brittle materials used and poor structural strength. Now obsolete, Orangeburg pipe...
The 7 Worst Things You Could Do To Your Plumbing  System

The 7 Worst Things You Could Do To Your Plumbing System

Taking care of your plumbing system, and managing your water consumption behaviors isn’t rocket science, by any means. However, you might be surprised what fairly common, detrimental mistakes so many Lubbock homeowners make every day. These mistakes can build in severity over time, and snowball into major plumbing disasters if left unattended. 1.) Ignoring the Signs Easily, the worst thing you can do to your home plumbing stems from negligence; ignoring the warning signs of a pipe failure or other plumbing problems will only cause those problems to develop, and result in higher restorative costs later on. Common signs of a plumbing problem you should take immediate note of include persistent clogging, lawn indents, poor water pressure, and lawn moisture. If you notice any of these signs, do not ignore them or forget about them! By acting fast, you can mitigate not only damage to your plumbing, but the extent of later repairs. Very often, we see major plumbing damages as the result of negligent care; damages which are entirely avoidable with the right care and attention given. 2.) Using Chemical Cleaners One of the worst things homeowners can do to their home plumbing systems is also one of the most common methods people use to “clean” their drain pipes. The fact of the matter is that these chemical cleaners can actually be very hazardous to your home plumbing system, and may even damage your pipes. The pressurized, foaming action and unnecessary additives that make these chemical solutions work are also what make them dangerous to your plumbing. If you routinely use these cleaners to resolve home pipe issues, you may actually be causing the erosion and breaking down of your own pipes! Over periods of use, these cleaners will naturally begin to eat away at the inner walls of your pipe....
How to Retrieve Items that Wash Down the Drain

How to Retrieve Items that Wash Down the Drain

Valuable items can wash down the drain in the blink of an eye. That beautiful engagement ring you took off to do the dishes? An earring that slipped down the bathroom sink? You might think that they are lost forever, but with a little luck, you can retrieve them with no harm done. All it takes is a bit of DIY skill and some basic knowledge of your drain plumbing. The Beauty of a P-trap The first thing you need to do as soon as you see an item slide into the drain is to turn the faucet off immediately. That will decrease the chance of whatever it was from getting carried all the way to the drain stack, at which point it will drop into the sewer line and you will never see it again. If you stop the water in time, however, the item will likely remain in the trap under the sink. In fact, jewelry, probably the most frequent valuable item to get washed into the drain plumbing, is actually one of the easiest things to retrieve. Metal and gemstones sink in water, which increases the chance that they will sink to the bottom of the plumbing trap. Take note, however, that you should try to retrieve any solid object that goes down the drain, even if it’s of little or no value. If the object gets stuck in the trap, it will start to accumulate hair and debris and may eventually cause a clog in your drain plumbing. A Successful Retrieval The trap under your sink is actually designed to keep nasty sewer odors from backing up into your sink, but it doubles as a handy way to catch lost...
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